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NEWS NA61B LETTER 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION - EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 

Frank E. Schooley, Editor, Station WILL, Urbana, Illinois 


FiBRUARV 5 ? * 942 


SUNDAY BROADCASTS FOR IVHA 

Starting Sunday (February i) radio listeners will enjoy additional 

BROADCASTS AS STATE-STATION V7HA CHANGED ITS “ S 8 LENT ON SUNDAY*’ POLICY 
AND TAKES TO THE AIR ON A SEVEN-DAYS-A-WEEK SCHEDULE. NEW PROGRAMS 
PLANNED ESPECIALLY FOR &IS00N3IN LISTENERS WILL BE FEATURED IN THE 
EXPANDED SERVICE, H. B. McCaRTY, THE STATION DIRECTOR, HAS ANNOUNCED«. 

H The hope,” saio McCarty, “is that we may serve a large audience which 

IS NOT ABLE TO LISTEN TO DAYTIME PROGRAMS DURING THE WEEK. THE PRO¬ 
GRAMS WILL BRING TO THE MICROPHONE THE BEST WISCONSIN TALENT AND 
THOUGHT AVAILABLE. 0 Y.'HA IS LIMITED 3Y FEDERAL REGULATIONS TO BROAD* 
CASTING DURING DAYLIGHT HOURS. 

“Wisconsin Industry At War“ is a new program to be heard at 4:00 o’clock 
on the Sunday schedule. It is a moving story of what the men and wo¬ 
men OF THE BADGER STATE ARE DOING TO PRODUCE THE MATERIALS NEEDED TO 
WIN THE WAR. 

Back-stage looks at the tremendous power Wisconsin factories are 

PUTTING INTO THEIR VICTORY EFFORTS WILL BE GIVEN IN THIS SERIES. IHE 
SCHOOL OF COMMERCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN HAS PLANNED THE 
SERIES UNDER THE TITLE “WISCONSIN INDUSTRY At W'aR. “ AMONG THE REPRE¬ 
SENT AT IVE COMPANIES WHOSE EFFORTS WILL BE DEPICTED ARE THE FOLLOWI NG J 

February I - Gisholt Machine Co. 

8 - Allis-Chalmers Manu- 

FACURING Co. 

15 - Fairbanks Morse & Co. 

22 - Kohler Co. 

March I - Kearney-Trecker Corp. 

8 - The Heil Co. 


The PLAN IS TO SHOW' what is being done and so stimulate greater civilian 

PARTICIPATION IN THE ALL-OUT VICTORY PRODUCTION CAMPAIGN. JOYCE JAEGER, 
WHA SCRIPT EDITOR, IS IN CHARGE OF THE WRIIT ING OF TH€ PROGRAMS AND 
PERSONALLY GATHERS AND AUTHENTICATES THE MATERIAL INCLUDED. 

“Why the U. S. Must Fight Again” is the topic to be discussed by 

WISCONSIN'S EMINENT HISTORIAN, PROFESSOR JOHN D. HICKS ON THE UNIVERSITY 

Forum at 3:30 o’clock. Each week a vital topic will be analyzed bv 

AN AUTHORITY. 





NAE8 NEWS LETTER 


Page 2 




Other programs included on the new Sunday ft HA schedule are "Varsity C 

Wisconsin alumni;- Program *of the Week, repeat on the week’s best 
broadcast; and a number of Ft me musical offerings such as Vesper 
Jnion music Hour, Urgan Reverie, ano The Sunday Noon Lus^cale. 


TEACHERS PLAN PnOGRAfuS rOK SCHOOLS 


Moods for travel, moods for finding out—mooos ©f all kinds—escape, 

SPORTS, LAUGHS, MAKING FRIENDS—FIND EXPRESSION IN THE SERIES OF BROAD¬ 
CASTS FOR HIGH-SCHOOL YOUTH KNOWN AS "INVITATION TO READING." T H E PRO¬ 
GRAMS ENCOURAGE LEISURE TIME READING BY GIVING SAMPLES OF RECOMMENDED 

WRITINGS. 

Teachers of English, through their radio committee in the Wisconsin 
Education Association, have arranged the broadcasts f.or school-room 

LISTENING AND PREPARED A HANDBOOK TO SUPPLEMENT THE PROGRAMS. 

"Invitation to Reading" is broadcast by wha , Madison and WL8L, Stevens 
Point, at 1:30 each Monday afternoon. In addition to the school groups 

THE PROGRAMS ARE HEARO BY MANY ADULT LISTENERS. THE WISCONSIN SCHOOL 
OF THE A|R PROVIDES SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL FEATURES EACH SCHOOL-DAY AT 

9:30 a.m. ano I:30 p.m. 


KftSC SCHOOL OF THE AIR 


The KWSC School of the Air, a group of educational programs presented 

BY THE RADIO SERVICE OF THE STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON, OFFERS ONE 
HUNDRED AND FORTY-EIGHT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS EACH WEEK IN ADDITION 
TO OTHER KWSC BROADCASTS FOR PUBLIC SERVICE AND ENTERTAINMENT. Fl FTY- 
SIX OF THE PROGRAMS ARE LISTED AS CURRENT EVENT FEATURES, TWENTY SIX 
AS EOUCATIONAL MUSIC PROGRAMS, TWENTY AS AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS AND 
SIXTEEN PERTAINING TO LITERATURE. THERE ARE TWELVE HOME ECONOMICS 
PROGRAMS AND SIX FEATURES ABOUT SCIENCE. 

Seven thousand students, faculty members, and visitors filled the Len s 
Gymnasium at the State College of Washington when Alumnus Edward R. 

MUR ROW, ACE C.8.S.- CORRESPONDENT, SPOKE ON JANUARY 29. 


MURROY/ APPEARED BEFORE THE MICROPHONE OF THE STATION AT WHICH HE RE¬ 
CEIVED HIS F I RSTr RADIO EXPERIENCE. KWSC, OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE 
State College of Washington, now broadcasts eighty hours a week with 
5000 WATTS PO'"Eft. NOTED for its training in engineering *no operating, 

AS WELL AS IN RADIO SPEECH, WRITING, AND MANAGEMENT, THE ^ T A T E COLLEGE 

of Washington has placed at least 89 graduates in professional radio 

positions. 


WNYC ADDS TWO DEFENSE' PROGE -V.Lv 

WNYC, New York City, added two more defense programs to its schedule: 
on Thursday, January 22. Presented in cooperation with City College, 








NAEB NEV.S LETTER 


Page 3 






THE PROGRAMS ARE KNOWN AS “THE DEMOCRACIES WILL WIN” (THURSDAYS), AND 

“The Role of Science in War 11 (Saturdays)* 

Speaker on the first program of the series was Or* Harry n. Wright, 

NEWLY-APPOINTED HEAD OF THE COLLEGE. The TOPIC Of HIS FIRST TALK WAS 

“The Meaning of Total War". The Saturday morning program was inaugurated 
by Professor Richard B. Mop.ris of the Department of History and head of 
the Civilian Defense Council recently bet up at the College to coor¬ 
dinate Defense Work. 

Later talks in the series will feature other prominent members of the 
City College faculty, including Professor Walter R. Sharp and Pro¬ 
fessor Benjamin Harrow. 


MiCHI CAN 1 S DEFENSE PROGRAM 

The University of Michigan, through station WJR, is in the. midst of 
presenting a series of weekly broadcasts on the general subject “United 
for Defense”. One program which has already appeared on the air may 
interest educational radio people; it is a talk by Leo Fitzpatrick, 
vice-president of Station WJR, on the subject of “Radio and Defense.“ 
Copies of this program may be obtained by writing station WJR, Detroit, 
Michigan. For the complete schedule, it is suggested that you write 
the University of Michigan Broadcasting Service, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 


€OLL€G£ STATION COURSES 

A LETTER TO THE RADIO BRANCH OF THE WAR DEPARTMENT’S BUREAU OF PUBLIC 

Relations from KWSC is quoted sn full: “The State College of 'Washing¬ 
ton WILL OFFER A NON—CRED J T COURSE IN CODE AND ELEMENTARY PRINCIPLES 
OF RADIO COMMUNICATION* THE CLASS WILL MEET FOR THREE OR FOUR HOURS 
WEEKLY DURING THE EVENINGS. BOTH BOYS AND GIRLS HAVE BEEN ENCOURAGED 

TO ENROLL. 

IT IS EXPECTED THAT MANY OF THE STUDENTS ENROLLED WILL BECOME SUFFI¬ 
CIENTLY INTERESTED TO CONTINUE THEIR STUDIES UNTIL THEY CAN QUALIFY 
AS LICENSEO OPERATORS. THE TRAINING RECEIVED IN THE COURSE WILljpRE- 
PARE MEN STUOENTS FOR CERTAIN COMMUNICATION DUTIES IN THE &RMED 

SERVICES. 

THE KWSC TRANSMITTER AND FACILITIES WILL BE USED ONLY FOR OCCASIONAL 
DEMONSTRATIONS. A FEW MEMBERS OF THE KWSC STAFF WILL ASSIST IN THE 
ADMINISTRATION OF THE COURSE.“ 

Says Ed Kirby: “There is a very real need of personnel trained for 

COMMUNITY DUCIES IN THE ARMED FORCES, AND THERE IS NO QUESTION BUT 

THAT the college stations offer a remarkable opportunity for coor¬ 
dinating TRAINING OF THE TYPE DESIRED. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON 
THIS, YOU MIGHT WRITE TO THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS SINCE 
THAT ORGANIZATION IS KEEPING IN TOUCH WITH METHOOS AND TECHNIQUES OF 
ORGANIZING THESE COURSES.** 







NAEB NEWS LETTER 


Page 4 


February I> 1942 


DR. W. Vi. CHAFFERS TO RETIRE 


After serving as director 
ucational Research since 
ACTIVE DUTY AUGUST 31. 


of Ohio State University's Bureau of £d~ 
1928 , Or. V/. W. Charters will retire from 


The well known educator will then devote his full time to writing, 

GATHERING TOGETHER THE THREAOS OF RESEARCH WHICH HE HAS SEEN DOING 

FOR MANY YEARS, AT OHIO STATE AND ELSEWHERE. 


Announcement of Dr. 

TRATIVE RESPONSIBILI 


Charters* desire to qe relieved of his adminis 

TIES WAS MADE BY PRESIDENT HOWARD L. 8EVIS. 


The retiring director, nationally know as education, 

HAS BUILT THE OHIO STATE BUREAU INTO ONE OF THE BEST KNOWN RESEARCH 
ORGANIZATIONS IN THE FIELD. ITS STUDIES, FFcEQUENTLY SUPPORTED 
FINANCIALLY BY NATIONAL FOUNDATIONS, HAVE EXTENOED INTO MANY AREA., 
-—CURRICULUM, TESTS, HOUSING, EVALUATION, MOVIES, RADIO. 

Onp of HIS EDUCATIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS HAS BEEN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF 

Ohio State of thI annualInstitute for Education by Radio, held here 
annually since 1930 to bring together hundreds of representatives 

OF RADIO AND EDUCATION FOR A DISCUSSION OF COMMON PROBLEMS. 


STERLING FISHER TO NBC 


Sterling Fisher, noteo for outstanding achievements in the PROt f>TtoN 
of culture and understanding through radio between the 

appointed assistant TO Or. James Rowland a NG ell, public service 

COUNSELLOR FOR THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY AND FORMER P^SIDENT 

of Yale University, according to an announcement made by Dr. Angell. 

Mr. Fisher who, in December/ was awarded a citation for singular con¬ 
tributions TO THE ADVANCEMENT OF A FRIENDLY EXCHANGE OF RADIO ED¬ 
UCATIONAL BROADCASTS BETWEEN THE AMERICAS, WILL ASSIST DR . AnGELL IN 
THE ESTABLISHMENT BY NBC OF A PERMANENT InTER-AmERICAN NI VERS IT Y 

OF THE A|R. 

In making this announcement, Or. Angell saio, h ?oday, as NEVER BEFORE, 

W^RlS EVENTS ARE MAKING THE PEOPLE OF ALL THE AMERICAS VIVIDLY AWARE 
OF THE INCREASED NEED FOR MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE CULTURES AND 
ANO^DEALS^WHICH PREVAIL AMONG ALL OF THE NATIONS IN THE WESTERN HEMI¬ 
SPHERE." 


AMEKl CAN EXHIBITION OF RECOP 0JJ£5S 

Entries for the Sixth American Exhibition of Recordings of Educational 
Radio Programs will close March 15 , it was been announced by . 

Keith Tyler, Director of the Institute for Education by Radio. In- 









NAEB MEWS LETTER 


Page 5 


February I, 1942 


FORMATION REGARDING CLASSIFICATIONS, RULES AND ENTRIES MAY BE SECUR'D 
BY WRITING THE INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION BY RADIO, Oh 10 STATE UNIVERSITY, 

Columbus, Ohio. 


PRELIMINARY CURB ON BROADCAST AUTHOR) ZATIONS 

At the request of the Defense Communications Board, pending the adoption 

OF A SPECIFIC POLICY BY THAT BOARD AND THE WaR PRODUCTIONS BOARD WITH 
RESPECT TO CURTAILING STANDARD BROADCAST CONSTRICTION TO MEET MATERIALS 
REQUIREMENTS BY THE MILITARY, THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 
WILL MAKE NO FURTHER GRANTS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW STANDARD BROAD¬ 
CAST STATIONS OR AUTHORIZE CHANGES IN EXISTING STANDARD BROADCAST TRANS*” 
MITTING FACILITIES WHERE ALL OR A SUBSTANTIAL PART OF THE PRIMARY AREA 
IN EITHER CATEGORY ALREADY RECEIVES GOOD PRIMARY COVERAGE FROM ONE 
OR MORE OTHER STATIONS. 

IN GENERAL THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION’S STANDARDS OF GOOO 

Engineering Practice will be used as a guide in the determination of 

GOOD PRIMARY SERVICE. ANNOUNCEMENT WAS MADE JANUARY 30. 


F. C. C. ACTIONS 

WRUW, World Wide Broadcasting Corporation, was granted temporary extension 

OF LICENSE. (1/21/42) 

WSAJ, Grove City College, was granted special permission to operate 

ADDITIONAL TIMES IN ORDER TO CARRY FOUR BASKETBALL GAMES IN FEBRUARY 

ano March. (1/30/42) 

WOI, Iowa State College, was denied permission to operate additional 
hours in February. ( 1 / 30 / 42 ). 

WILL, University of Illinois, was granted special permission to operate 

ADO ITIONAL TIMES ON CERTAIN NIGHTS IN FEBRUARY IN ORDER TO BROADCAST 
BASKETBALL GAMES. (1/30/42) 


Schocley 









Scanned from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters Records 
at the Wisconsin Historical Society as part of 
"Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public and Educational Radio Collection." 


'oiTu> c KTwe 
\\KWAVEs 


A collaboration among the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, 
University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Communication Arts, 
and Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Supported by a Humanities Collections and Reference Resources grant from 
the National Endowment for the Humanities 


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UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 



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HISTORICAL 

SOCIETY 





WISCONSIN 




NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE 


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views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication/collection do not necessarily reflect those of the 

National Endowment for the Humanities.